Curriculum Associates’ Ready® Louisiana Mathematics Receives Highest Rating from the Louisiana Department of Education

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With a recent Tier 1 rating of Grades 6–8, the complete Ready Louisiana Mathematics program for Grades K–8 now meets all non-negotiable criteria and required indicators of superior quality

Following the most recent Grade 6–8 rating, the complete Ready Louisiana Mathematics program for Grades K–8 is now rated as Tier 1 by the Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE). This highest rating from the LDOE, which was given after a comprehensive, educator-led review process, signifies the instructional program “exemplifies quality” and “meets all non-negotiable criteria and meets all required indicators of superior quality.”

To ensure that teachers and students have high-quality instructional materials, LDOE established the review process to assist local education agencies in identifying textbooks and other instructional materials that align to Louisiana Student Standards (LSS). This process and rating system support local school systems and educators in making informed decisions on instructional materials, adoptions, and purchases. The reviewers are all public educators who are trained on LSS, as well as on LDOE’s evaluation rubric that examines elements such as the focus, coherence, and rigor of instructional materials.

“To meet the needs of both students and educators, it is essential that instructional materials align to—and meet the rigor of—content standards,” said Rob Waldron, CEO of Curriculum Associates. “We commend the Louisiana Department of Education for its comprehensive process that informs districts of the high-quality instructional materials available to them and look forward to partnering with more districts throughout the state to support math instruction with Ready Louisiana Mathematics.”

The Ready Louisiana Mathematics program develops students’ procedural fluency and emphasizes conceptual understanding through reasoning, modeling, and discussion that explore the structure of mathematics. The lessons use a research-based, discourse-focused instructional model with a balance of conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and application to build confidence and mastery of the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

The Council of Chief State School Officers underscores the rigor of the state’s high-quality evaluation process, saying, “Louisiana has been a leader in ensuring every teacher has access to high-quality instructional materials that will support improved instruction for all students. The Council of Chief State School Officers strongly believes every student and teacher should have equitable access to high-quality instructional materials, and we are proud to share lessons learned from Louisiana’s pioneering work as a model for other states as they work closely with local districts to adopt and implement high-quality instructional materials and ultimately close the achievement gap.”

To learn more about the LDOE review process, visit: LouisianaBelieves.com/Academics/Online-Instructional-Materials-Reviews.

To learn more about Ready Louisiana Mathematics, visit: CurriculumAssociates.com/Products/Ready/Mathematics. Select Louisiana as the state from the dropdown menu.

 

About Curriculum Associates

Founded in 1969, Curriculum Associates, LLC designs research-based print and online instructional materials, screens and assessments, and data management tools. The company’s products and outstanding customer service provide teachers and administrators with the resources necessary for teaching diverse student populations and fostering learning for all students.

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