Weekly News Brief 2/24-3/2 Senate committee OKs bill to give Texas teachers a $5,000 raise | 8 Ways Schools Can Form a Better Relationship With the Media

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Senate committee OKs bill to give Texas teachers a $5,000 raise – By Lauren Mcgaughy, Dallas Morning News

The Texas Senate Committee on Finance has voted for a bill that would give every classroom teacher a $5,000 raise beginning next year.

Senate Bill 3 was approved unanimously on Monday and will be debated by the full Senate soon. If it succeeds there, it will head to the House for debate in committee. Sponsored by Flower Mound Republican Jane Nelson, the legislation would require school districts to give every full-time classroom teacher $5,000 more than what they're making this year. About 350,000 educators would be eligible for the raise at a cost of $1.8 billion a year beginning in 2020, the Legislative Budget Board estimates.

The bill was amended Monday to extend the raise to charter school teachers, and to cover the state's additional pension costs associated with the raise. School districts would not be able to lower a teacher's salary in future years to supplant the raise and Nelson said state funding for the "classroom teacher salary allotment" would be continuous unless future lawmakers write it out of existence.

 

8 Ways Schools Can Form a Better Relationship With the Media – By Stephen Noonoo, EdSurge

We live in a media obsessed society—and media literacy isn't just for students. Educators need it too. Learning to interact with the press is a big part of that because too often schools find themselves reacting to news coverage, instead of helping shape it themselves.

“There's a lot of good stuff that goes on in school districts that we're not aware of, especially if teachers, principals and communications people aren't telling us,” says Alia Malik, an education reporter for the San Antonio Express-News.

At the recent TCEA 2019 conference in San Antonio, Chris Piehler of the public relations firm PR With Panache hosted a panel discussion with EdSurge, Malik and other Texas journalists. Panelists dished on how schools can better work with the media, how they can pitch their own stories to news outlets and how to find the perfect hook. These are the top takeaways from that conversation.